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What I'm doing with my life?

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What I'm doing with my life?

  • OsmanHamid
    OsmanHamid 0 cheers 2018-01-20 12:02:28

    Working on being a superhuman!!

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  • chanchal
    chanchal 0 cheers 2018-01-20 10:10:04

    Just try to enjoying it.

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  • envirotech
    envirotech 0 cheers 2018-01-20 09:29:14

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  • watchbobsleighwinterlive
    watchbobsleighwinterlive 0 cheers 2018-01-20 05:39:34

    #Watch Winter Olympic Game 2018 Bobsleigh Live streaming cbs sports

    One of the town's own is heading back to the Olympics.Jazmine Fenlator-Victorian will pilot Jamaica's first Olympic women's bobsled team at the Olympic Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea next month.It will be Fenlator-Victorian's second appearance at the Olympics. She competed for the United States in 2014 in Sochi, Russia. She and track star Lolo Jones finished 11th in the two-man bobsled event."PyeongChang will be my second appearance at the Winter Games, but it is just as special as my first," Fenlator-Victorian said in a statement released by the Jamaica Bobsled and Skeleton Foundation Monday. "This time I have the opportunity to represent my other home — Jamaica and make history as the first female team representing the country in the Winter Olympic games."Fenlator-Victorian was a track star while at Wayne Valley. Her mother's battle with Lupus was an inspiration for her to keep working as hard as she could.The Wayne Township Council and Mayor Chris Vergano honored Fenlator-Victorian when she returned home from the 2014 Winter Olympics."Going to the Olympics wasn't necessarily just a personal goal, but a goal for me to represent Wayne, New Jersey," she said in 2014."When the media asks me, 'what do you call yourself?'...I'm a Jersey Girl. And, when you have teammates from Miami, Florida, California, and New York City, they just don't get it. But, when I come home...you guys get it."We all remember the heart-warming tale of the male Jamaican bobsleigh team qualifying for the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics.Disney turned their epic story into a cult film, and now it seems that history is repeating itself.Thirty years after that incredible achievement, Jamaica's women's bobsled team have emulated the men's in qualifying for the Pyeongchang Winter games this year.The girls sealed their qualification over the weekend, according to the Jamaica Bobsleigh and Skeleton Federation.Now, pilot Jazmine Fenlator-Victorian, brakewoman Carrie Russell and Audra Segree are headed to South Korea.Back in December, they showed their pedigree at the Winterberg World Cup where they finished seventh.So, they'll be targeting a top 10 finish at the Winter Olympics with their German coach Sandra Kiriasis, which gets underway on February 9.Their success echoes that of Devon Harris, Dudley Stokes, Michael White, Freddy Powell and Chris Stokes, who won everyone's hearts at the 1988 Winter Olympics.They were the first Jamaican bobsledders to earn notoriety and their exploits became a 1993 movie starring the late John Candy.And just like that team, these group of girls come from an athletic background.Back in November, Fenlator-Victorian insisted the group were made up of "experienced, world-class, elite athletes."She added: "Although my brakewomen may have limited experience in bobsleigh, (they) are some of the most elite with training, physical ability and mental toughness."Coupled with Nigerian's bobsleigh women's team becoming the first African sled to compete at the Winter Olympics, it promises to be an intriguing year.So, as the boys once said: 'Feel the rhythm, feel the rhyme... get on up, it's bobsled time.'Jamaica is sending a women's bobsleigh team to next month's Winter Olympics, 30 years after the country's men made their first historic appearance.They will be led in Pyeongchang by Jazmine Fenlator, who competed for USA as a push-athlete at Sochi 2014.The men made their legendary Olympic debuts at Calgary in 1988, which led to the making of the film Cool Runnings.

    Jamaica's women will be targeting a top-10 result, having finished seventh at December's Winterberg World Cup.American-born Fenlator switched to join her father's native Jamaica in 2015.Pyeongchang will be my second appearance at the Winter Games, but it is just as special as my first," the 32-year-old said."This time I have the opportunity to represent my other home - Jamaica - and make history as the first female team representing the country in the Winter Olympic Games."Brakewoman Carrie Russell, who won a gold medal in the 4x100m relay at the World Athletics Championships in 2013, will make her first Winter Olympic appearance in South Korea."This is one of the happiest moments of my life," the 27-year-old said. "I never dreamed that I would become a bobsled athlete."Fenlator and Russell will be joined in the team by brakewoman Audra Segree, who also competed on the track as a sprinter."A leap of faith and a dream come true later I will be representing my country as one of the first women bobsled athletes in the Olympics," Segree, 27, said."I am overwhelmed with joy knowing that I have helped make history for my country. I am really grateful for this experience."Jamaica's men's team is currently ranked 31st in the Olympic qualification list and there are 30 places in the competition.If any higher-placed nation withdraws their team, Jamaica would be given a qualification spot for their seventh appearance in the men's two-man event.On Monday, Nigeria's women's bobsleigh team announced they would be the first African sled to compete at a Winter Olympics.Thirty years after the nation's fabled debut in Calgary, Jamaica are sending their first women's bobsleigh team to the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang next month. Jazmine Fenlator, who was a member of the United States team four years ago in Sochi, will pilot the Jamaican sled having switched to the country of her father's birth in 2015.Fenlator, who will be joined by brakewoman Carrie Russell, a former world athletics relay gold medallist, will be targeting a top-10 finish after coming seventh in the Winterberg World Cup last month.Jamaica's exploits in 1988 inspired the hit movie 'Cool Runnings' and turned its bobsleigh squad into cult heroes. The men's team went on to participate in five of seven subsequent Games, but will not be represented in Pyeongchang.Jamaica Bobsleigh and Skeleton Federation president Chris Stokes told the Jamaica Gleaner: "This is the 30th anniversary of the first team to qualify in 1988, and we are glad to have a women's team qualify."Stokes was a member of the men's team which famously overturned on their fourth and final run down the Olympic track in Calgary.KINGSTON, Jamaica — The Jamaica Bobsleigh & Skeleton Federation (JBSF) today announced that it will be sending a women’s team to the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games in South Korea next month.It is set to mark Jamaica women’s bobsleigh team's first appearance at the Olympics, though the announcement comes three decades after the small tropical island made its debut Winter Olympic Games appearance.Though not medalling, Jamaica men's bobsled team boggled minds with an impressive show at the 1988 Winter Olympic Games in Canada. Their performances inspired the 1993 film Cool Runnings.“This is one of the happiest moments of my life, I never dreamed that I would become a bobsleigh athlete. Today also marks three years since I lost my father, which makes this journey even more meaningful," said brakeman Carrie Russell, a first timer at the Winter Games.Audra Segree, an admired track athlete with a personal best of 11.30 seconds over 100 metres, has also been selected as a brakeman.Meanwhile, Jazmine Fenlator-Victorian is to pilot for the Jamaica team. Fenlator-Victorian previously piloted for USA in the 2014 Winter Games before returning to her roots and joining JBSF in 2015.The men’s team is currently ranked 31st on the Olympic Qualification list, one spot out of qualification.

    If any teams forego their selection, Jamaica would be next in line to make its seventh appearance in the men’s two-man event on the 30th anniversary since their debut in Calgary. The Jamaica Bobsleigh and Skeleton Federation is now making plans for the Winter Olympic Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea, next month after the national women's bobsled team qualified for the Olympiad at the weekend.This is the first time a women's team will be representing the nation at the Winter Olympics, and the feat comes 30 years after Jamaica's first overall experience at the Calgary Games in 1988.Brakeman Carrie Russell said that qualifying for the women's bobsleigh event is one of the happiest moments of her life.Russell, a member of Jamaica's gold medal-winning 4x100 women's relay team at the 2013 IAAF World Championships in Moscow, Russia, is in her second season as a bobsledder, and said qualifying holds sentimental value for her, as it happened three years to the day her father died.Her teammates are brakeman Audra Segree, who is another sprinter, and pilot Jazmine Fenlator-Victorian.
    The Nigerian women's bobsleigh team is set to make history at Pyeongchang 2018 for not just their country but Africa as a whole.Seun Adigun, Ngozi Onwumere and Akuoma Omeoga are the first athletes from their country to earn their place at a Winter Olympics.The trio, all from sprinting backgrounds, are also the first African team to make it into the bobsleigh after a Go Fund Me campaign backed their training and qualification campaign.Pilot Adigun competed in the 100m hurdles at London 2012 while Onwumere ran for Nigeria at the IAAF World Relays in 2015. Omeoga, who will compete with Onwumere for the brakewoman spot, ran for the University of Minnesota.Despite being the lowest ranked team to take on the track at Alpensia Sliding Centre in Pyeongchang, Nigeria is going for no less than a medal."No-one signs up to go to Games to not be one of the top three," Adigun said, having raised the £66,000 they needed in just 11 months online."One of the things that you aspire to is to have a podium spot with respect for the process and respect for the learning curve of what it is that we're actually doing."
    Their inspirational story, reminiscent of the Jamaican men's bobsleigh team at Calgary 1988 made famous by the film Cool Runnings, is told in a new short film advertising Beats by Dre.Adigun speaks about wanting to create a legacy with her achievements on the ice against the odds.
    "You can live in your own legacy, but you gotta start somewhere," she says."Our goal is to create a legacy where people will never be limited by the fear of the unknown."Interestingly, Nigeria will be competing against Jamaica's women who are making their own history in South Korea, 30 years after their men.Jazmine Fenlator will race in her second Winter Games after competing in 2014 for the USA. Her team-mates bring imposing resumes from the track onto the bobsleigh course.Carrie Russell was a 2013 World Championships gold medalist in the 4x100m relay while Audra Segree also sprinted on the world stage.Nigeria's women's bobsleigh team will make history in Pyeongchang as the first African sled to compete at the Winter Olympics.Seun Adigun, Ngozi Onwumere, and Akuoma Omeoga hit the qualifying standard in November but needed to maintain their world ranking until 14 January.Nigeria will be represented for the first time at the Winter Olympics.Simidele Adeagbo will also fly the West African nation's flag in the women's skeleton.All three bobsledders were once track and field athletes before switching to winter sports, with Adigun competing in the 100m hurdles at the London 2012 Olympics.Adigun will pilot the Nigerian sled in South Korea with either Onwumere or Omeoga to be selected as brakewoman."It's surreal," said Adigun, speaking in November."One of the things that you aspire to is to have a podium spot with respect for the process and respect for the learning curve of what it is that we're actually doing."Adeagbo, 36, only took up skeleton four months ago but will compete in Pyeongchang after finishing third in her two races at the North American Cup in Lake Placid, New York at the weekend.The Canadian-born slider - a former triple and long jumper - first expressed an interest in bobsleigh but was encouraged to try skeleton instead.Akwasi Frimpong has been confirmed as Ghana's first Olympic skeleton athlete.Frimpong, who will turn 32 during the Games, was born in Ghana before moving to the Netherlands aged eight.After enjoying success as a young athlete - winning the Dutch 200m junior title in 2003 - Frimpong switched to winter sports after missing out on the London Olympics through injury.Frimpong was first introduced to bobsleigh - narrowly missing the cut for the Dutch team for Sochi 2014 - before changing to skeleton.Sliders were required to be in the IBSF world top 60 to qualify for Pyeongchang - a feat Frimpong achieved with 14th- and 15th-place finishes in Lake Placid at the weekend."I'm ready to represent Ghana for the first time in history in the skeleton event at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games," he said.Africa was first represented at the Winter Olympics at Sarajevo 1984 by Senegalese alpine skier Lamine Gueye.At Sochi 2014, Togo and Zimbabwe were the only nations from the continent to send athletes to the Winter Olympics. Bruce Tasker's withdrawal from Winter Olympics contention after a minor stroke can inspire his Great Britain bobsleigh team-mates says John Jackson.Jackson and 30-year-old Welshman Tasker were part of the four-man team that finished fifth at Sochi 2014, although that could be upgraded to bronze due to Russian athletes being disqualified.But Jackson says Tasker's "heartache" can inspire success in Pyeongchang.

    "It's going to give that extra oomph to the guys in the sled," Jackson said."It's put that little bit more of a challenge towards the guys and hopefully they can step up."The good thing with the Great Britain team at the moment is that they have got strength in depth... so although he [Tasker] will be missed, the guys that are put in will also do a very good job."Jackson, Tasker, Joel Fearon and Stuart Benson are in line for a bronze medal after the disqualification of two Russian teams from the 2014 Games.The Russian athletes can appeal against the decision, but if the disqualification is upheld the GB team is likely to be upgraded.While that could provide some solace for Tasker, Jackson admits missing the 2018 Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea, is a huge blow."I'm heartbroken for Bruce, he's put in so much work since 2014 and for this to happen to him just weeks before the final selection it's just heartbreaking for him," added Englishman Jackson."I think sports like bobsleigh that are hard - contact sports like rugby, martial arts, that sort of thing - I think it comes to a point where your body sometimes tells you that you're ready to finish rather than you're coming to a natural end where you make that decision."British bobsledder Bruce Tasker insists a minor stroke will not stop him receiving a retrospective Winter Olympic medal in Pyeongchang next month if the opportunity arises.Tasker has been ruled out of competing in the Games after suffering a minor stroke last Thursday, but is expected to make a full recovery. And the 30-year-old says he is still ready and able to jump on a plane to South Korea if there is a chance of being awarded his belated bronze medal from Sochi 2014.
    Tasker was part of the four-man crew which finished in fifth place four years ago and is in line for an upgrade after two Russian crews that finished ahead of them were handed doping bans.And the International Olympic Committee has indicated its desire to re-award the medals in Pyeongchang provided the sanctions are upheld by the Court of Arbitration for Sport later this month.Tasker said: “I’m fit to travel. If there was any chance of receiving a medal out there in Pyeongchang with my team-mates, I’d definitely be keen to do that.”Tasker won a bronze medal in a World Cup race in Park City earlier this season but has been back in England recuperating from a series of low-level injuries.He attended Wexham Park Hospital after suffering symptoms of dizziness and nausea, and was subsequently transferred to the stroke unit in High Wycombe on Saturday.Tasker added: “I’m gutted not to be able to conclude the four-year cycle by going to the Olympics but I’m very grateful that I’m still fit and healthy.“I’m still sore but, otherwise, I feel fine. I’m set to make a 100 per cent recovery and I already feel as though I’m most of the way there.”Tasker has no intention of retiring from top-level sport and is expected to resume training with the squad later this year.
    GB Bobsleigh performance director Chris Price said: “The last few days have been worrying for all who know and care for Bruce but we are naturally delighted that he is on course to make a full recovery.”Bruce Tasker – Great Britain’s star bobsleigher - will miss the Winter Olympics in South Korea next month after suffering a minor stroke.The 30-year-old Welshman is expected to make a full recovery after falling ill with dizziness and nausea on January 4.The former athlete – who switched skills in 2010 – said: “To me, this was a completely freak occurrence.“I was unlucky to be in this situation, but I'm lucky to have come out of it unscathed."I'm set to make a 100 per cent recovery and I already feel as though I'm most of the way there.”Tasker has represented Team GB at six World Championships and the Winter Olympics in Sochi.
    Bruce Tasker Tasker represented Team GB at six World Championships and the Winter Olympics in SochiBruce Tasker Tasker represented Team GB at six World Championships and the Winter Olympics in SochiBruce Tasker switched to bobsleigh from athleticsAnd was part of the team that won the silver at the World Cup event in Lake Placid in 2013.Team GB chef de mission Mike Hay added: “We are desperately sorry for Bruce to lose his chance of becoming a two-time Olympian so close to the Pyeongchang 2018 Games.And GB Bobsleigh performance director Chris Price added: "The last few days have been worrying for all who know and care for Bruce but we are naturally delighted that he is on course to make a full recovery.

    "We will now ensure Bruce and his family have all the necessary support in place to aid that process."Thirty years after the nation's fabled debut in Calgary, Jamaica are sending their first women's bobsleigh team to the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang next month.Jazmine Fenlator, who was a member of the United States team four years ago in Sochi, will pilot the Jamaican sled having switched to the country of her father's birth in 2015.Fenlator will be joined by brakewoman Carrie Russell, a former world athletics relay gold medallist.They will be targeting a top-10 finish after coming seventh in the Winterberg World Cup last month.Jamaica's exploits in 1988 inspired the hit movie 'Cool Runnings' and turned its bobsleigh squad into cult heroes. The men's team went on to participate in five of seven subsequent Games, but will not be represented in Pyeongchang.Jamaica Bobsleigh and Skeleton Federation president Chris Stokes told the Jamaica Gleaner: 'Jamaica was offered a quota allocation spot for women's bobsleigh, which we have gladly accepted.They had a difficult time in Germany (in the first race this year). We did not get a good result. But we made adjustments and came back and had a very strong performance in San Moritz, which set us up. 'This is the 30th anniversary of the first team to qualify in 1988, and we are glad to have a women's team qualify, and we expect them to do well.'Stokes was a member of the men's team which famously overturned on their fourth and final run down the Olympic track in Calgary.This could be the most uncertain Olympic bobsled competition in some time.The most wide open, too.In 2014, it was widely expected that Russia would be tough to beat in the two- and four-man races. And it was, with Alexandr Zubkov winning gold in both events, only to have those medals stripped as part of the fallout from the state-sponsored doping program that has left a giant cloud over what the home team did at the Sochi Games.In 2010, Steven Holcomb and his famed "Night Train" sled lived up to expectations and finally ended the Americans' 62-year gold medal drought in the Olympic four-man race. In 2006, Andre Lange of Germany was the consensus pick to pull off the daunting double -- gold in both events -- and he delivered.Zubkov is now banned. Holcomb died last year. Lange has long been retired.So this year in Pyeongchang, a new men's Olympic bobsled driving star will have to emerge. Germany, Canada, Latvia, Switzerland and the U.S. all will head to these Olympics believing they have a realistic chance of reaching the medal podium, and so will the host South Koreans, though they would still seem to be a longshot.The women's bobsled race is much easier to figure out, even with 20 sleds. Five drivers are the only ones with realistic medal shots:Canada's Kaillie Humphries is chasing her third straight gold medal. Elana Meyers Taylor and Jamie Greubel Poser of the U.S. won silver and bronze, respectively, in 2014 and German drivers Mariama Jamanka and Stephanie Schneider have also worked their way toward the top of the world rankings.Here's some things to know going into the bobsled competitions in Pyeongchang:
    Germany in men's bobsled, the U.S. and Canada in women's bobsled.They're friends, but that doesn't stop Canada's Kaillie Humphries and U.S. star Elana Meyers Taylor from also being rivals. They finished first and second, respectively, in Sochi, and Humphries is going for her third straight gold. Another wrinkle in this cold war of sorts: Todd Hays, the longtime U.S. bobsledder and coach, is now helping coach the Canadians.Codie Bascue and Evan Weinstock are two sliders that the U.S. program has pointed to for years as future cornerstones of the program. Their time is now. Pyeongchang marks the Olympic debuts for Bascue, a pilot, and Weinstock, who teammates boldly predict will go down as the best push athlete in U.S. history.They don't handle like race cars, but there's race-car technology at play in bobsledding. BMW works with several national teams, including the U.S., Germany and Canada, among others -- with all the programs done separately. Ferrari works with the Italians, and McLaren was part of the British bobsled program in recent years.In all three sliding sports, Curve 9 will likely decide the whole race. There are other tricky spots on the Pyeongchang track, but chances are high that the driver who gets through that turn the best over four runs will reach the medal podium.Most bobsledders will likely take part in the opening ceremony, but then everyone waits around for more than a week before competition starts. Bobsled goes last in the Olympic sliding program, after luge and skeleton. There are no medals awarded in bobsled until Day 10 of the games (and the women don't even start competing until Day 11).As with many other sliding sports, the difference at the Olympics as opposed to the World Cup circuit is that races are four heats over two days, instead of two heats in one day.The two-man race might be completely wide open after six drivers combined to win the first seven World Cup events this season.
    Canada's Chris Spring, an Australian-born bobsledder, survived a frightening crash in Germany six years ago and now is one of the biggest medal threats in Pyeongchang.Grigory Rodchenkov, the whistleblower at the heart of the Russian doping scandal, will submit evidence to the Court of Arbitration for Sport next week when Russia fights the case against 39 athletes who have been banned from competing in the 2018 Winter Olympics.The International Olympic Committee's disciplinary commission found the group of athletes guilty of anti-doping rule violations during the 2014 Games in Sochi, and issued a ban from all future editions of the Olympics, but the group of athletes – who cover a range of sports including ice hockey, skeleton, bobsleigh and biathlon – are contesting their suspension. Their case will be heard by CAS on 22 January at the International Conference Centre in Geneva in a hearing expected to last a week. The 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea, begins on 9 February.Rodchenkov is currently in witness protection in the United States and has said he fears for his life in the wake of the scandal, in which he revealed damning evidence of a state-sponsored doping programme in Russia. He will testify via video or telephone conference, as will Professor Richard McLaren, who delivered the damning two-part report in 2016 investigating the scandal.

    A further group of three Russian athletes will have their cases heard on a future date.Croatia will have both a two-man and four-man bobsleigh team at the 2018 Olympic Winter Games for the first time in its history.After the two-man team of Drazen Silic and Mate Mezulic qualified for the 2018 Olympic Winter Games when they finished 9th (2:01.03) at the North American Cup at Lake Placid, the four-man team has obtained their ticket to the Games just two days later.The four-man team, made up of Pilot Drazen Silic and pushers Martin Maric, Mate Mezulic and Damjan Zlatnar, attain the Olympic standard when they finished 7th at the same meeting at Lake Placid.The Croatian team finished 2.87 seconds behind the winning American team but did enough to qualify for the Games.Previously Croatia has only had a four-man bobsleigh team at the Olympics, appearing for the first time at the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City.The 2018 Olympic Winter Games will be held from 9-25 February in South Korea.British bobsledder Bruce Tasker insists a minor stroke will not stop him receiving a retrospective Winter Olympic medal in PyeongChang next month if the opportunity arises.Tasker has been ruled out of competing in the Games after suffering a minor stroke last Thursday, but is expected to make a full recovery.And the 30-year-old says he is still ready and able to jump on a plane to South Korea if there is a chance of being awarded his belated bronze medal from Sochi 2014.Tasker was part of the four-man crew which finished in fifth place four years ago and is in line for an upgrade after two Russian crews that finished ahead of them were handed doping bans.And the International Olympic Committee has indicated its desire to re-award the medals in PyeongChang provided the sanctions are upheld by the Court of Arbitration for Sport later this month.Tasker said: “I’m fit to travel. If there was any chance of receiving a medal out there in PyeongChang with my team-mates, I’d definitely be keen to do that.”Tasker won a bronze medal in a World Cup race in Park City earlier this season but has been back in England recuperating from a series of low-level injuries.He attended Wexham Park Hospital after suffering symptoms of dizziness and nausea, and was subsequently transferred to the stroke unit in High Wycombe on Saturday.Tasker added: “I’m gutted not to be able to conclude the four-year cycle by going to the Olympics but I’m very grateful that I’m still fit and healthy.“I’m still sore but, otherwise, I feel fine. I’m set to make a 100 per cent recovery and I already feel as though I’m most of the way there.”Tasker has no intention of retiring from top-level sport and is expected to resume training with the squad later this year.GB Bobsleigh performance director Chris Price said: “The last few days have been worrying for all who know and care for Bruce but we are naturally delighted that he is on course to make a full recovery.”The Jamaican women's Bobsleigh team have qualified for the 2018 Winter Olympics, the first time the country will be participating at the event since 1988.Jamaica were last represented at the Winter Olympics in 1988 by the men's Bobsleigh team and have been absent from the games since then.Their women's Bobsleigh team have however made history as they have sealed qualification.According to the BBC, The Jamaican team would be led by Jazmine Fenlator, an athlete who represented the United States at the 2014 winter Olympics in Sochi.
    The American born Jazmine said "Pyeongchang will be my second appearance at the Winter Games, but it is just as special as my first,"
    "This time I have the opportunity to represent my other home - Jamaica - and make history as the first female team representing the country in the Winter Olympic Games."Among the Jamaican bobsleigh team is Carrie Russell who is the Brake woman, she is a gold medal winner at the World Athletics Championship in the 4 by 100m relay event,.Carrie said, "This is one of the happiest moments of my life, I never dreamed that I would become a bobsled athlete."The third woman who makes up the Jamaican bobsled team is Audra Segree who is a Brake woman and like Russell she is a sprinter.She said "A leap of faith and a dream come true later I will be representing my country as one of the first women bobsled athletes in the Olympics."IT was Ashleigh Werner’s second time in a two-woman bobsleigh.The first run down Whistler had left her retching and barely able to stand up.But the second run handed the Winter Olympics hopeful the biggest test of her life.

    “We were going really fast and it was my pilot’s first time in a two-man sled so the weight was different, the steers were different; the sled was different... Everything was completely different.”Then a moment the 24-year-old Aussie will never forget.We smashed into the wall before corner 13 really hard and got pushed away from the belly of the curve,” she recounted.My pilot tried to keep the sled off corner 13, but the pressure just dragged us up and flipped us off the end.”Werner’s partner was OK, but the accident was devastating for Ashleigh.“I knew something was wrong straight away and I tried to get my other shoulder off the ice by dragging myself into the sled, but I couldn’t put any weight on my left shoulder.As soon as we stopped, I knew it was a lot worse than I had originally thought.Werner’s left shoulder was dislocated, it had a rotator cuff tear, and also a bicep tendon impingement.“It was the absolute worst pain I have ever been in,” she said.
    “I was told I was going to need surgery and I wasn’t sure if I was going to play rugby or bobsleigh again.”Werner’s a keen sportswomen and no stranger to injuries. She’s played soccer, touch football, netball, swimming and athletics, and currently rugby for the NSW Women’s 7s side.
    But this setback left her in a “mess”“I was told it was a six month minimum rehab with surgery,” said Werner.“It was heartbreaking.“I had given up rugby nationals to come over and do this for three months and I couldn’t even do that.”Werner had an Olympic dream and the talent to compete in Pyeongchang.Crucially, she still had the belief she could get there.“I think it’s a rugby mindset. No matter how hard I get hit or knocked down, I will always get back up,” she said.“I was worried I would have issues, but I always knew I was going to push through the physical barrier.”And remarkably, Werner did just that.“I did six weeks of intense rehab with a lot of physical therapy and physiotherapist. Both myself and my physio were really impressed with the speed at which I recovered.“So six weeks later I was back at Whistler, pushing Bree off (one of her partners).“It was terrifying but also amazing to be able to overcome that fear.She added: “It was really hard getting back in the sled, and for months I had nightmares.”It was a triumphant return, but three months later her nightmares became a reality.“It wasn’t until I got back to Australia did I find out I had broken my right collarbone as well,” she said.“I had been so focused on the rotator cuff, I hadn’t even noticed.“Imagine the pain you have to be in to not notice you’ve broken a bone and it’s been broken for three months!”However, that experience gave her the mental toughness she needed to succeed.“It pushed me through any fear I have had,” she said.“I realised that bobsleigh is not about not having any fear; it’s about being able to tap into that fear and do your job despite it.“A really valuable lesson for life.”
    Exactly one year later to the day, Werner was running the sled off the top of a new track for the first time in Calgary.This year she raced at the track she had her life-changing moment and finished eighth overall.Now, she’s days away from finding out if her three-person Australian team will qualify for the 2018 Winter Olympics.Werner, Bree Walker and Mikayla Dunn, just need to finish in the top 40 countries in the world after two more races in Europe.Currently they’re 36th.Werner never saw this happening in her “wildest dreams”.“I got into bobsleigh completely by accident,” she said.“A friend invited me to test data sets for the Aussie Women’s Team and it turned out they were national trials.“Three weeks later I was on a plane to Canada.”She proved herself in the physical testing, and showed dedication to becoming a top athlete. Rugby also helped her “take a hit”.Bobsleigh had a learning curve, but it didn’t take Werner long to fall in love with the sport and the potential pathway to the Olympics.“Bobsleigh is so much more than pushing a sled for five seconds and jumping in,” she said.“The pilot has to understand exactly how to steer depending if they enter a curve too early, too late or on time, what to do if they’re skidding out, how to deal with adversity should something go wrong... everything!“The brakeman has to get the mechanics of the start push, know the track with their head between their legs, put their life in someone else’s hands and know how to fix almost every part of the sled - should something go wrong.“The training is crazy amazing and it’s pretty different to any sport I’ve done before. You’re mostly doing 5-6 second push starts. Basically it’s like eight months of solid power training for five seconds of running.“It’s a lot of gym time - fast, powerful and explosive movements. Lots of cleans, squats and dead lifts. Then there’s the sprint factor - a lot of short, sharp, max speed stuff.“Then there’s push training. Back home, we have a sled on wheels that we use to practice pushing, and in Calgary, there’s the ice house (a training facility that simulates the start of a bobsleigh track).
    “There is such a big technical side that I never expected, but I have absolutely fallen love with it as well.”She added: “I always wanted to make an Olympics, but I never ever imagined that I’d have a chance in a winter sport.”“It’s mind boggling. There are no words to explain it. Every time I think of where I am now and how far I’ve come, I get pretty overwhelmed.”“Everything in my life has completely changed, from my study plans, to my training, to my diet.“It’s been a mental shift and a physical one. I’ve had to build muscle I never needed before and move my body in ways that it never has.“Not only that, but this season is six months long for us (if we make the Olympics Games), so it’s been about making connections and figuring out where in the world we need to go to give us the best chance and the best experience.“It’s been a long slog but it’s been incredible.”Werner’s rugby aspirations have now taken a back seat, with bobsleigh her main focus.“I am in bobsleigh for the long haul my coach wants me to keep up some rugby during the off-season so my body stays accustomed to getting hit and having impact.”“I have three Olympics in me for bobsleigh and that’s what I plan on doing with those years.”Werner’s story of overcoming the odds can draw some parallels with the 1993 movie Cool Runnings, where Jamaican sprinters form a bobsleigh team to qualify for the 1988 Calgary Olympics.While Werner doesn’t think the movie reflects the current state of the sport, she said ‘Warm Nations’ are still the outsiders among the competitors aiming to qualify for the Olympics.“We have a little ‘Warm Nations’ crew that consists of us, Jamaica, Nigeria, Croatia, and Brazil, and the sport is like a family so it’s an awesome place to be,” she said.She added: “The Jamaicans are actually some of our closest friends... we even tried to watch Cool Runnings with them one night but that didn’t go down very well.“At the end of the day, it’s not a very well known sport for our nation, so whatever people associate it with works for me.”Werner and her teammates are self-funded athletes. To help support them on the Road to the Winter Olympics, you can donate here.

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